Our Center for the Study of Southwestern Jewelry, the first major gallery expansion in the Wheelwright Museum’s 78-year history, will open on the weekend of June 6-7, 2015 with an all-day celebration for Wheelwright Museum members on June 6 and a FREE Public Day on June 7. The Center for the Study of Southwestern Jewelry will include the first museum gallery anywhere devoted permanently to the past, present, and future of Native American jewelry and related traditions in the Southwest.

 

Generous business supporters of our opening include Hotel Santa Fe, Thornburg Investment Management, Century Bank, La Fonda, Los Alamos National Bank, SERVPRO Santa Fe, and Studio Southwest Architects.

Grand Opening Celebration Schedule

MEMBERS’ DAY
Saturday, June 6 • 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Ribbon Cutting
10:00 a.m.

Membership Table
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Gallery Viewing Sessions
10:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The Feasting Place – Native Food Vendor ($)
10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Under the Tent

Native Jewelry Demonstrations
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Under the Tent

Jared Chavez
Richard Chavez
Dale Edaakie
Angie Reano Owen
Norbert Peshlakai
Perry Shorty
Liz Wallace

Zuni Fetish Education Booth: Kent McManis
10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Outside the Case Trading Post

Turquoise Education Booth: Emerald Tanner
10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Outside the Case Trading Post

Children’s Activity
10:30 a.m.
Library Foyer

Surviving Desires Booksigning by Henrietta Lidchi
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Sand Painting Demos by Zachariah Ben
11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Classroom

Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers
12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
In Front of the Library

Storytelling and Music with Robin Easton and Stephen Fadden
1:30 p.m.
Library

If you are not a member, you will want to become a member to participate in the special Members’ Day festivities. New memberships will also be sold at the event.

FREE PUBLIC DAY
Sunday, June 7 • 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Membership Table
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Gallery Viewing Sessions
10:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

The Feasting Place – Native Food Vendor ($)
10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Under the Tent

Native Jewelry Demonstrations
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Under the Tent

Dale Edaakie
Isaiah Ortiz
Norbert Peshlakai
Charlene Reano

Children’s Activity
10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.
Under the Tent

Sand Painting Demos by Zachariah Ben
11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Classroom

Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers
12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
In Front of the Library

Storytelling and Music with Robin Easton and Stephen Fadden
1:30 p.m.
Library

 

Download Flyer Schedule (8.5″ x 11″)

Download Poster Schedule (11″ x 17″)

View Event on Facebook

 

Demonstrating Artists

d_jared

Jared Chavez

Jared Chavez learned metalsmithing from his father, word-class jeweler Richard Chavez, and further developed his skills by attending the Graduate Jeweler program at the Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts in San Francisco, California. Together, Jared and Richard run Chavez Studio. Bold and graphic, Jared’s bracelets, belts, rings, and earrings typically feature curving lines and forms which have become his signature. Jared has been inspired by such diverse influences as Hiroshige and Picasso. It is not unusual for the images on his pieces to reflect Jared’s own self awareness of the passages in his life or his approach to art.

d_richard_1

Richard Chavez

Richard Chavez was born and raised in San Felipe Pueblo, New Mexico. In the early 70’s Richard worked as an architectural draftsman for Harvey S. Hoshour, A.I.A., who had worked for the Bauhaus Architect, Mies Van De Rohe. The Bauhaus philosophy emphasizing the principles of purity, spareness, and balance greatly influenced the jewelry designs for which Richard Chavez has become known. His collectors appreciate him as a lapidary artist with deep foundations in refinement of design, dramatic styling, and pristine craftsmanship. He is constantly in a process of elevating his craft by seeking out new materials of the highest quality, by experimenting with new polishing techniques to meet his exacting standards, and by constantly refreshing his line of designs.

d_dale

Dale Edaakie

Dale Edaakie is a master Zuni Pueblo inlay artist known for his realistic, detailed depictions of wildlife and nature. Dale comes from a family of skilled artists — his parents, Dennis and Nancy Edaakie, are famous for their inlay jewelry of birds, and his brother Derrick is a talented inlay artist in his own right. Dale has created a variety of animal designs and naturalistic creations, including roses, butterflies, peacocks, pheasants, fish, deer, bears, and even a series of pins inspired by John James Audubon’s watercolors of North American birds.

d_isaiah

Isaiah Ortiz

Isaiah Ortiz was raised in San Felipe Pueblo and learned jewelry-making from his father, Raymond Twinhorse. Although inspired and taught by his father, Isaiah has his own distinctive style. Geometric images predominate in his very distinctive designs. He works in silver and occasionally uses exotic inlay materials such as White Angel turquoise, dinosaur bone and black coral.

d_angie_owen

Angie Reano Owen

Angie Reano Owen is a contemporary jeweler from Santo Domingo Pueblo. Angie is primarily known for her shell inlaid jewelry techniques. She uses delicate pieces of turquoise, jet, and coral inlaid in a mosaic pattern on shell to form her jewelry. This style of inlay dates back to the ancient Anasazi and Hohokam Indian culture.

d_peshlakai

Norbert Peshlakai

Norbert is a fourth generation Navajo silversmith, born in Fort Defiance, AZ. The name Peshlakai means “silver” in Navajo. Norbert makes his own stamps from concrete nails and has developed his very own styles of textures and overlays. He is credited with developing a new form: miniature silver pots and jars shaped like pottery. He made his first silver pot in 1977. Norbert has been awarded many ribbons at the Santa Fe Indian Market, The Heard Museum’s Indian Fair & Market and other major shows for his creative silver work.

d_charlene

Charlene Reano

Charlene Reano is from San Felipe and married into Santo Domingo Pueblo. She collaborates with her husband, Frank, on most of their jewelry. In the early 1980’s they began making mosaic inlay jewelry with finely crafted, colorful patterns of shell, turquoise, and other stones. Charlene is known for the distinctive style of two-sided necklaces. Each side is laid with mosaic in differing stone and colors. Her necklaces often display a single cube or “chicklet” among the beads supporting the mosaic inlay elements. The Reanos have been represented in the Case Trading Post for over ten years.

d_perry

Perry Shorty

Perry Shorty’s work strongly reflects classic Navajo silver jewelry made the last quarter of the 1800’s through the 1930’s. His techniques and materials are varied and include ingot silver, fabrication, tufa-cast, repousse, twist and drawn wire, filework, applique and set stones. Design ideas come from studying old pieces of Navajo jewelry. Today, Perry Shorty’s work is recognized worldwide. He sells out each year at Santa Fe Indian Market.

d_liz

Liz Wallace

Liz Wallace (Maidu/Washoe/Navajo) has pushed contemporary Native jewelry in exciting new directions. Liz is known for her experimentation with new and old forms and techniques. Butterflies, dragonflies, fishes, and other creatures made from the finest turquoise, silver, gold, and other materials are among her creations. Some of her most ambitious work has been in plique-?-jour, an Old World enameling technique she has used to create flowers, leaves, and the wings of insects. In 2011, the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian featured Liz ‘ s work in the exhibition and catalog Nature Nurtures: Jewelry by Liz Wallace

Zachariah Ben

Zachariah Ben

Zachariah Ben

As a homeschooler, Zachariah Ben had the opportunity to study traditional Navajo ceremonies. He apprenticed under his father, Joe Ben, Jr., learning to create ceremonial sandpaintings and contemporary sandpaintings, made using only natural stones. Zach will demonstrate contemporary sandpainting at the Center for the Study of Southwestern Jewelry Grand Opening Celebration both Saturday, June 6 and Sunday, June 7.Zach Ben has shown his sandpaintings at Shiprock Trading Post, Santa Fe, NM; Garland’s Navajo Rugs, Sedona, AZ; Hoel’s Indian Shop, Sedona, AZ; and River Trading Post, Scottsdale, AZ. He has won awards at various art shows, including first place in the youth division of the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial.

 

Education Booths

Kent McManis

Kent is a native New Mexican, born in Albuquerque. He began collecting katsina dolls at age three and later branched out into other areas, especially Zuni fetishes. Kent runs Grey Dog Trading in Old Town Albuquerque with his business partner Yvonne Stokes, and has been involved in the business of Native American art for 42 years. Since 1989, Kent has been judging and jurying various Native American art shows including the Santa Fe Indian Market, the Heard Museum show, the Gallup Inter-Tribal Ceremonial and the Museum of Northern Arizona Zuni and Hopi shows. He has authored five books on Zuni fetishes, Navajo textiles and Hopi katsina dolls.Here at the Wheelwright, Kent McManis curated two exhibits of Zuni fetishes and wrote their respective catalogs, Zuni Fetish Carvers: The Mid-Century Masters and Zuni Fetish Carvers of the 1970s: A Bridge from Past to Present.

Kent_at_October_show_small

Joe E. Tanner, Sr and Emerald Tanner

Father-daughter duo Joe E. Tanner, Sr and Emerald Tanner are fourth and fifth generation traders, respectively. “Trading among the Native American people since 1872,” the Tanners specialize in Southwest Indian Art. Joe and Emerald enjoy working directly with artists of the Greater Gallup, New Mexico area. Tanner’s Indian Arts serves as an art gallery and jewelry store in the heart of downtown Gallup with a focus on high grade, all-natural, gem-quality turquoise. Having been involved in the mining, cutting and grading of turquoise since the mid-1950s, Joe is an authority on natural turquoise. Emerald Tanner has performed education seminars on turquoise for archeological groups, museums and collectors.

emerald_tanner

 

Performers

Pueblo of Pojoaque Hoop Dancers

Hoop dancing was brought to the Pueblo of Pojoaque in June 2013 with the help from the LaRance family. From there, 12 students have dedicated their time to learn and perfect the art of hoop dancing. Students meet and work with each other on new designs and new dance routines.

Since June 2013, the young dancers have traveled to Phoenix, Arizona, twice to compete in the annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest. The youth have also danced internationally in France, Switzerland and Italy for dignitaries from their respective countries. Each dancer shares their own unique dancing style as they weave their hoops into many different designs. This beautiful high energy dance helps to teach the young dancers discipline and respect.

Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers

Robin Easton and Stephen Fadden

Robin Easton, author of Naked in Eden: My Adventure and Awakening in the Australian Rainforest, is a writer, inspirational speaker/storyteller, musician, nature photographer, and adventurer. She has appeared in magazines and newspapers throughout the U.S. and Canada, and in an award-winning NBC News affiliate piece, Paul Harvey News, KBLA Radio, The Nature Connection: Big Blend Radio Magazine, The Green Hour: WURD 900AM, The Huffington Post, and others.

Stephen Fadden is a storyteller, musician, motivational speaker, and educator. He has been a featured lecturer and performing artist for the National Gallery of Art; the Smithsonian Institution; the National Museum of the American Indian and many storytelling festivals. He was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to be the 2007 Visiting Scholar at the Institute of American Indian Arts, where he currently is an adjunct faculty member and Distance Learning Coordinator for the Business Entrepreneurship and Academic Technology department.

robin_easton_stephen_fadden_cropped_small

 

 

 

Please Support the Businesses Who Are Making Our Celebration Possible:

Hotel Santa Fe logo

TIM_2c_RGB_72
CENT-Logo_WeBringLocal_CMYK Los Alamos National Bank logo Studio SW Architects logo
Print